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20

Mar

Photographer begins epic journey to photograph our nation’s struggling bees
Photographer Clay Bolt is rolling out a huge project, traveling across the United States documenting the state of the nation’s bees, including the species responsible for pollinating our most popular crops.

16

Mar

5,000 honeybees strap on tiny backpacks in the name of scienceAustralian scientists are attaching sensors to bees to track their movements and study colony collapse disorder.

5,000 honeybees strap on tiny backpacks in the name of science
Australian scientists are attaching sensors to bees to track their movements and study colony collapse disorder.

25

Feb

What are neonicotinoids, and how do they affect bees?

20

Feb

Wild bumblebees are catching diseases from domesticated honeybees, says studyNew research conducted in the UK reveals that diseases common in “managed” bees are now reaching wild populations.

Wild bumblebees are catching diseases from domesticated honeybees, says study
New research conducted in the UK reveals that diseases common in “managed” bees are now reaching wild populations.

06

Feb

Bumblebees can fly higher than Mount EverestThat the bees can survive in higher elevations is good as climate change may have dramatic effects on their habitats at lower elevations.

Bumblebees can fly higher than Mount Everest
That the bees can survive in higher elevations is good as climate change may have dramatic effects on their habitats at lower elevations.

05

Feb

Why do bees love saltwater pools? Hint: It has to do with their feetBees, like many other insects, rely on more than just their mouths to taste things and find nutrients they need.

Why do bees love saltwater pools? Hint: It has to do with their feet
Bees, like many other insects, rely on more than just their mouths to taste things and find nutrients they need.

03

Feb

5,000 honeybees strap on tiny backpacks in the name of science
But how do you attach a sensor to a tiny honeybee?It turns out that it’s not that complicated. 1. Refrigerate the bee."We take the bee into a cold place, usually to a fridge about 5 degrees Celsius (41 degrees F), for five minutes and that is enough to have the bees sleeping," de Souza told the Australian Broadcasting Company. 2. Shave the bee. (Yes, really.)"Very young bees, they’re very hairy. At times we need to do something to help us," he said. 3. Use tweezers to glue the sensor to the bee’s back."It doesn’t disturb the way the bee will see or the way the bee will fly, they just work normally," he said.
Read more.

5,000 honeybees strap on tiny backpacks in the name of science

But how do you attach a sensor to a tiny honeybee?
It turns out that it’s not that complicated.
 
1. Refrigerate the bee.
"We take the bee into a cold place, usually to a fridge about 5 degrees Celsius (41 degrees F), for five minutes and that is enough to have the bees sleeping," de Souza told the Australian Broadcasting Company.
 
2. Shave the bee. (Yes, really.)
"Very young bees, they’re very hairy. At times we need to do something to help us," he said.
 
3. Use tweezers to glue the sensor to the bee’s back.
"It doesn’t disturb the way the bee will see or the way the bee will fly, they just work normally," he said.

Read more.

Wild bees are recycling plastic, study findsTwo bee species in Canada have begun using plastic waste to build their nests, hinting at the extent of plastic pollution as well as nature’s limited ability to adapt.

Wild bees are recycling plastic, study finds
Two bee species in Canada have begun using plastic waste to build their nests, hinting at the extent of plastic pollution as well as nature’s limited ability to adapt.

23

Jan

5,000 honeybees strap on tiny backpacks in the name of scienceAustralian scientists are attaching sensors to bees to track their movements and study colony collapse disorder.

5,000 honeybees strap on tiny backpacks in the name of science
Australian scientists are attaching sensors to bees to track their movements and study colony collapse disorder.

21

Jan

Bee minus: Pesticides shrink baby bumblebeesExposure to pyrethroid pesticides stunts the growth of bumblebee larvae, a new study finds, resulting in smaller workers that may be less adept at foraging for food.

Bee minus: Pesticides shrink baby bumblebees
Exposure to pyrethroid pesticides stunts the growth of bumblebee larvae, a new study finds, resulting in smaller workers that may be less adept at foraging for food.