Mother Nature Network on Tumblr MNN on Facebook MNN on Twitter
Mother Nature Network

12

Jul

Know your travel footprintTry this handy carbon calculator to find out how your travel can impact the environment.

Know your travel footprint
Try this handy carbon calculator to find out how your travel can impact the environment.

13

Nov

Your virtual carbon footprint may be bigger than you thinkSure, you live in the cloud, but are you really living a greener life?

Your virtual carbon footprint may be bigger than you think
Sure, you live in the cloud, but are you really living a greener life?

28

Dec

What is Santa’s carbon footprint?

14

Nov

Aging population may reduce global warmingA demographer has profiled the relationship between age and a person’s carbon dioxide emissions, showing that after retirement age, our individual contributions to global warming decline.

Aging population may reduce global warming
A demographer has profiled the relationship between age and a person’s carbon dioxide emissions, showing that after retirement age, our individual contributions to global warming decline.

07

Oct

How nations are coping with rising seas
The first victims of rising oceans will be nations like Kiribati, Tuvalu and the Maldives, but the tragic irony of these island nations struggling against encroaching seas is that most of them don’t have much of a carbon footprint. Many residents live without cars or electricity and subsist on food they catch or grow themselves. In fact, the countries at greatest risk account for less than 0.1 percent of the total output of carbon dioxide emissions. (Combined, the U.S. and China account for nearly half.)Still, some of these nations are leading the world in reducing carbon emissions. Maldives President Mohamed Nasheed says his country will be carbon neutral by 2020, and he’s investing $1.1 billion in alternative energy. “Going green might cost a lot, but refusing to act now will cost us the Earth,” he said.Photo: Ankit Stephen looks on at the edge of a lagoon in Majuro, Marshall Islands, whose encroaching waves are toppling shoreline coconut trees.

How nations are coping with rising seas

The first victims of rising oceans will be nations like Kiribati, Tuvalu and the Maldives, but the tragic irony of these island nations struggling against encroaching seas is that most of them don’t have much of a carbon footprint. Many residents live without cars or electricity and subsist on food they catch or grow themselves. In fact, the countries at greatest risk account for less than 0.1 percent of the total output of carbon dioxide emissions. (Combined, the U.S. and China account for nearly half.)

Still, some of these nations are leading the world in reducing carbon emissions. Maldives President Mohamed Nasheed says his country will be carbon neutral by 2020, and he’s investing $1.1 billion in alternative energy. “Going green might cost a lot, but refusing to act now will cost us the Earth,” he said.

Photo: Ankit Stephen looks on at the edge of a lagoon in Majuro, Marshall Islands, whose encroaching waves are toppling shoreline coconut trees.

05

May

10 first steps to lighter livingItching to go green and not sure where to start? Try these simple ideas.

10 first steps to lighter living
Itching to go green and not sure where to start? Try these simple ideas.

25

Apr

Going local without going locoYou can change your buying and eating habits one step at a time.

Going local without going loco
You can change your buying and eating habits one step at a time.

14

Apr

Back in the day, before green was inBefore green was the new black, people spent a whole lot more time ‘being green’ than trying to ‘go green’.

Back in the day, before green was in
Before green was the new black, people spent a whole lot more time ‘being green’ than trying to ‘go green’.

14

Feb

plantedcity:

My, what BIG feet you have! Another way of visualizing our carbon footprints
Early this week I posted the Guardian’s Atlas of Pollution: The World in Carbon Dioxide Emissions infographic. Now comes another, this time from Miller-McCune Magazine and via Treehugger.
The new infographic shows the total and per capita carbon footprints of nations around the world and cleverly shapes them into feet. It’s an interesting way to communicate the information and I like how the feet humanize our emissions. However, I don’t know if it is necessarily as effective a communication tool as the Guardian version.
While the left foot (i.e. Total Carbon Emissions By Nation) clearly shows which countries are responsible for the greatest current carbon output (i.e. US, China, India, Japan, Russia) smaller contributors tend to get lost in the image. In comparison The Guardian’s use of a world map as the basis for its graphic made it easy to find individual contributors both regionally and globally. Its table at the bottom also provides access to specific data and ranks nations according to their output. Something the feet don’t do.
I do like the right foot (i.e. Total Carbon Emissions Per Capita) though and found its info to be revealing. It’s amazing to see that residents of small island nations have such massive footprints (e.g. Gibraltar, Virgin Islands US), but with a little thought it makes sense given their need to import many of the goods they consume. This is a challenge that the eco-conscious community on British Columbia’s tiny Bowen Island has been grappling with in their efforts to live sustainable lives.
I was also surprised at how seemingly small the footprints of dominant emitters such as China and the USA became as their total output is divided among their citizens. However, of course the thing to keep in mind is that it’s the total accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that matters in terms of climate change so while per capita information is valuable for context we can’t lose sight of the need to reduce our total output.
Note: For those of you who’d like to see yet another infographic dealing with national carbon emissions check out the Cancún-o-Gram produced in advance of COP16. It’s notable for showing both current and historical carbon output, which is one of the big bones of contention between developed and developing nations at international climate negotiations.

plantedcity:

My, what BIG feet you have! Another way of visualizing our carbon footprints

Early this week I posted the Guardian’s Atlas of Pollution: The World in Carbon Dioxide Emissions infographic. Now comes another, this time from Miller-McCune Magazine and via Treehugger.

The new infographic shows the total and per capita carbon footprints of nations around the world and cleverly shapes them into feet. It’s an interesting way to communicate the information and I like how the feet humanize our emissions. However, I don’t know if it is necessarily as effective a communication tool as the Guardian version.

While the left foot (i.e. Total Carbon Emissions By Nation) clearly shows which countries are responsible for the greatest current carbon output (i.e. US, China, India, Japan, Russia) smaller contributors tend to get lost in the image. In comparison The Guardian’s use of a world map as the basis for its graphic made it easy to find individual contributors both regionally and globally. Its table at the bottom also provides access to specific data and ranks nations according to their output. Something the feet don’t do.

I do like the right foot (i.e. Total Carbon Emissions Per Capita) though and found its info to be revealing. It’s amazing to see that residents of small island nations have such massive footprints (e.g. Gibraltar, Virgin Islands US), but with a little thought it makes sense given their need to import many of the goods they consume. This is a challenge that the eco-conscious community on British Columbia’s tiny Bowen Island has been grappling with in their efforts to live sustainable lives.

I was also surprised at how seemingly small the footprints of dominant emitters such as China and the USA became as their total output is divided among their citizens. However, of course the thing to keep in mind is that it’s the total accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that matters in terms of climate change so while per capita information is valuable for context we can’t lose sight of the need to reduce our total output.

Note: For those of you who’d like to see yet another infographic dealing with national carbon emissions check out the Cancún-o-Gram produced in advance of COP16. It’s notable for showing both current and historical carbon output, which is one of the big bones of contention between developed and developing nations at international climate negotiations.

09

Dec

Men who don't ask for directions waste $3,000

New study finds that the average male driver drives 276 miles lost every year. That’s a big carbon footprint for time badly spent!