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27

Nov

Melting ice could release old virusesGlobal warming could bring back viruses that have been frozen for millennia.

Melting ice could release old viruses
Global warming could bring back viruses that have been frozen for millennia.

28

Jun

geologise:

Ponds On The Ocean by NASA Goddard Photo and Video on Flickr

Photo Caption: “If you have never been north of the Arctic Circle, it is easy to imagine that the “ice cap” at the top of the world is a uniform sheet of white. The reality, particularly during the spring and summer melt, is a mottled landscape of white, teal, slate gray, green, and navy.”
“The sea ice atop the Arctic Ocean can—as shown in this photograph from July 12, 2011—look more like swiss cheese or a bright coastal wetland. As ice melts, the liquid water collects in depressions on the surface and deepens them, forming melt ponds. These fresh water ponds are separated from the salty sea below and around it, until breaks in the ice merge the two.”
“Researchers on the NASA-funded ICESCAPE mission—Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment—have been examining melt ponds, the ice around them, and the waters below for three weeks, with three more to go. Carried by the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy, a team of oceanographers, marine biologists, and glaciologists are investigating how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the ocean’s chemical and biological makeup.”
“The science team collects water samples to examine water chemistry and to observe the colonies of plankton growing in the water and on the surfaces of the ice. Other instruments are used to assess how much and how far sunlight is penetrating into—and warming—the Arctic Ocean. Still others are measuring the current systems that move water from the depths to the surface, as well as horizontally across the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas.”

geologise:

Ponds On The Ocean by NASA Goddard Photo and Video on Flickr

Photo Caption: “If you have never been north of the Arctic Circle, it is easy to imagine that the “ice cap” at the top of the world is a uniform sheet of white. The reality, particularly during the spring and summer melt, is a mottled landscape of white, teal, slate gray, green, and navy.”

“The sea ice atop the Arctic Ocean can—as shown in this photograph from July 12, 2011—look more like swiss cheese or a bright coastal wetland. As ice melts, the liquid water collects in depressions on the surface and deepens them, forming melt ponds. These fresh water ponds are separated from the salty sea below and around it, until breaks in the ice merge the two.”

“Researchers on the NASA-funded ICESCAPE mission—Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment—have been examining melt ponds, the ice around them, and the waters below for three weeks, with three more to go. Carried by the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy, a team of oceanographers, marine biologists, and glaciologists are investigating how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the ocean’s chemical and biological makeup.”

“The science team collects water samples to examine water chemistry and to observe the colonies of plankton growing in the water and on the surfaces of the ice. Other instruments are used to assess how much and how far sunlight is penetrating into—and warming—the Arctic Ocean. Still others are measuring the current systems that move water from the depths to the surface, as well as horizontally across the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas.”

09

May

Vast ice shelf in Antarctica is at risk of meltingWarmed waters are flowing underneath ice sheets, and causing them to melt from below.

Vast ice shelf in Antarctica is at risk of melting
Warmed waters are flowing underneath ice sheets, and causing them to melt from below.

27

Apr

Ice shelf in Antarctica has shrunk by 85%Images taken by a satellite show that the Larsen B ice shelf decreased from 4,373 square miles in 1995 to only 634 miles today.

Ice shelf in Antarctica has shrunk by 85%
Images taken by a satellite show that the Larsen B ice shelf decreased from 4,373 square miles in 1995 to only 634 miles today.

02

Mar

Oldest, thickest sea ice is vanishing rapidly in Arctic, NASA findsThe sea ice is shrinking at a rate of 15.1 percent per decade.

Oldest, thickest sea ice is vanishing rapidly in Arctic, NASA finds
The sea ice is shrinking at a rate of 15.1 percent per decade.

28

Feb

Melting Arctic causes snowier wintersMelting sea ice in the Arctic may be causing the snowier winters the northern hemisphere has experienced in the last 2 seasons.

Melting Arctic causes snowier winters
Melting sea ice in the Arctic may be causing the snowier winters the northern hemisphere has experienced in the last 2 seasons.