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Mother Nature Network

02

Apr

Even doubters want to prepare for global warming
The vast majority of Americans believe the globe is warming and they want to prepare for the worst.

Even doubters want to prepare for global warming

The vast majority of Americans believe the globe is warming and they want to prepare for the worst.

03

Feb

10 innovative ideas that would let us live on water

26

Jan

As the planet warms and ice sheets melt, sea levels are rising worldwide. During the last century, the oceans rose about 5-9 inches, according to the EPA, and sea levels could increase by up to 5 feet by 2100, threatening 180 U.S. coastal cities. But in some parts of the world, entire countries are at risk of vanishing beneath the seas. From Alaskan coastal communities to tiny Pacific island nations like Tuvalu (pictured left), political leaders and concerned citizens are working together to save their homes, their sovereignty and their identities from disappearing beneath the waves.How nations are coping with rising seas

As the planet warms and ice sheets melt, sea levels are rising worldwide. During the last century, the oceans rose about 5-9 inches, according to the EPA, and sea levels could increase by up to 5 feet by 2100, threatening 180 U.S. coastal cities. But in some parts of the world, entire countries are at risk of vanishing beneath the seas. From Alaskan coastal communities to tiny Pacific island nations like Tuvalu (pictured left), political leaders and concerned citizens are working together to save their homes, their sovereignty and their identities from disappearing beneath the waves.
How nations are coping with rising seas

06

Dec

Arctic’s record melt worries scientistsA NOAA report found that Greenland’s Arctic sea ice and glaciers were melting at a record rate and that sea-level rise has accelerated in the region.

Arctic’s record melt worries scientists
A NOAA report found that Greenland’s Arctic sea ice and glaciers were melting at a record rate and that sea-level rise has accelerated in the region.

20

Oct

6 island nations threatened by climate change

10

Oct

The Maldives are a picturesque chain comprising over 1,100 islands and atolls in the Indian Ocean. However, this paradise may soon be lost to rising sea levels. The highest parts of the Maldives rise to no more than 8 feet. This leaves its nearly 400,000 residents at great risk of storm surges and rising seas.6 island nations threatened by climate change

The Maldives are a picturesque chain comprising over 1,100 islands and atolls in the Indian Ocean. However, this paradise may soon be lost to rising sea levels. The highest parts of the Maldives rise to no more than 8 feet. This leaves its nearly 400,000 residents at great risk of storm surges and rising seas.
6 island nations threatened by climate change

03

Dec

The 33 islands that make up Kiribati sit barely above sea level these days, and more than half of the country’s 100,000 people are crowded onto the capital island of South Tarawa. Land is scarce and drinking water is in short supply, so to combat both overpopulation and rising seas, Kiribati has begun sending young citizens to Australia to study nursing. The Kiribati Australia Nursing Initiative is sponsored by the foreign aid organization AusAID and is aimed at educating Kiribati’s youth and getting them jobs. Most students who receive AusAID scholarships are trained and then sent home to help their developing countries; however, the KANI program is a little different because the graduates will work in Australia and someday bring their families to join them. KANI seeks to educate and relocate the people of Kiribati because their entire country may soon be underwater.How nations are coping with rising seas

The 33 islands that make up Kiribati sit barely above sea level these days, and more than half of the country’s 100,000 people are crowded onto the capital island of South Tarawa. Land is scarce and drinking water is in short supply, so to combat both overpopulation and rising seas, Kiribati has begun sending young citizens to Australia to study nursing. The Kiribati Australia Nursing Initiative is sponsored by the foreign aid organization AusAID and is aimed at educating Kiribati’s youth and getting them jobs. Most students who receive AusAID scholarships are trained and then sent home to help their developing countries; however, the KANI program is a little different because the graduates will work in Australia and someday bring their families to join them. KANI seeks to educate and relocate the people of Kiribati because their entire country may soon be underwater.
How nations are coping with rising seas

07

Oct

How nations are coping with rising seas
The first victims of rising oceans will be nations like Kiribati, Tuvalu and the Maldives, but the tragic irony of these island nations struggling against encroaching seas is that most of them don’t have much of a carbon footprint. Many residents live without cars or electricity and subsist on food they catch or grow themselves. In fact, the countries at greatest risk account for less than 0.1 percent of the total output of carbon dioxide emissions. (Combined, the U.S. and China account for nearly half.)Still, some of these nations are leading the world in reducing carbon emissions. Maldives President Mohamed Nasheed says his country will be carbon neutral by 2020, and he’s investing $1.1 billion in alternative energy. “Going green might cost a lot, but refusing to act now will cost us the Earth,” he said.Photo: Ankit Stephen looks on at the edge of a lagoon in Majuro, Marshall Islands, whose encroaching waves are toppling shoreline coconut trees.

How nations are coping with rising seas

The first victims of rising oceans will be nations like Kiribati, Tuvalu and the Maldives, but the tragic irony of these island nations struggling against encroaching seas is that most of them don’t have much of a carbon footprint. Many residents live without cars or electricity and subsist on food they catch or grow themselves. In fact, the countries at greatest risk account for less than 0.1 percent of the total output of carbon dioxide emissions. (Combined, the U.S. and China account for nearly half.)

Still, some of these nations are leading the world in reducing carbon emissions. Maldives President Mohamed Nasheed says his country will be carbon neutral by 2020, and he’s investing $1.1 billion in alternative energy. “Going green might cost a lot, but refusing to act now will cost us the Earth,” he said.

Photo: Ankit Stephen looks on at the edge of a lagoon in Majuro, Marshall Islands, whose encroaching waves are toppling shoreline coconut trees.

13

Sep

As the planet warms and ice sheets melt, sea levels are rising worldwide. During the last century, the oceans rose about 5-9 inches, according to the EPA, and sea levels could increase by up to 5 feet by 2100, threatening 180 U.S. coastal cities. But in some parts of the world, entire countries are at risk of vanishing beneath the seas.
How nations are coping with rising seas

As the planet warms and ice sheets melt, sea levels are rising worldwide. During the last century, the oceans rose about 5-9 inches, according to the EPA, and sea levels could increase by up to 5 feet by 2100, threatening 180 U.S. coastal cities. But in some parts of the world, entire countries are at risk of vanishing beneath the seas.

How nations are coping with rising seas

17

Aug

If a country disappears beneath the sea, is it still a country? Does it have fishing rights? What about a seat at the United Nations? Many small island states are seeking answers to these questions and exploring ways that they can exist as legal entities even if the entire population lives elsewhere.Take an intriguing look at how nations are coping with rising seas.

If a country disappears beneath the sea, is it still a country? Does it have fishing rights? What about a seat at the United Nations? Many small island states are seeking answers to these questions and exploring ways that they can exist as legal entities even if the entire population lives elsewhere.
Take an intriguing look at how nations are coping with rising seas.