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02

Oct

Smell the roses while you can! Your sense of smell could predict when you’ll dieLosing your ability to smell a sign of slowed cellular regeneration or the result of years of toxic environmental exposures.

Smell the roses while you can! Your sense of smell could predict when you’ll die
Losing your ability to smell a sign of slowed cellular regeneration or the result of years of toxic environmental exposures.

17

Jul

Odd reason some guys have fewer sex partnersMen without a sense of smell have fewer sexual partners than other men do, and women with the same disorder are more insecure in their partnerships.

Odd reason some guys have fewer sex partners
Men without a sense of smell have fewer sexual partners than other men do, and women with the same disorder are more insecure in their partnerships.

18

Jun

You’ve got smell: First ever ‘scent message’ sent from NYC to ParisThe researchers will display their scent devices, called oPhones, in cafes in Paris to test the devices’ business potential at places where aromas matter.

You’ve got smell: First ever ‘scent message’ sent from NYC to Paris
The researchers will display their scent devices, called oPhones, in cafes in Paris to test the devices’ business potential at places where aromas matter.

14

Dec

Why does fear make scary scents stronger?A new study shows that sensory neurons in the nose can adapt to recognize smells that accompany danger.

Why does fear make scary scents stronger?
A new study shows that sensory neurons in the nose can adapt to recognize smells that accompany danger.

09

Aug

The fuzzy, mesmerizing, starlike bloom of the stapelia gigantea is captivating enough to draw you in — but the stench is sure to drive you away. It’s a carrion flower, and emits the stench of rotting flesh. In fact, the flower’s hairy, leathery texture is believed to mimic the rotting flesh of a dead animal, for added effectiveness in luring in its pollinator of choice: flies.9 of the worst smelling flowers in the world

The fuzzy, mesmerizing, starlike bloom of the stapelia gigantea is captivating enough to draw you in — but the stench is sure to drive you away. It’s a carrion flower, and emits the stench of rotting flesh. In fact, the flower’s hairy, leathery texture is believed to mimic the rotting flesh of a dead animal, for added effectiveness in luring in its pollinator of choice: flies.
9 of the worst smelling flowers in the world

08

Nov

Humans can smell emotionsA smelly experiment proves that humans can smell fear and disgust on each other, and that the smell triggers the same feelings in them too.

Humans can smell emotions
A smelly experiment proves that humans can smell fear and disgust on each other, and that the smell triggers the same feelings in them too.

26

Apr

My sense of smell improved after I nixed chemical fragrancesI never even realized how much ‘fake’ scents cut down on my ability to smell.
Read more from our blogger.

My sense of smell improved after I nixed chemical fragrances
I never even realized how much ‘fake’ scents cut down on my ability to smell.

Read more from our blogger.

30

Jan

jtotheizzoe:

What do you smell like? I mean, really smell like? And WHY do you smell like you smell like?
The natural odors of most animals, besides those like skunk musk, are actually a result of bacteria digesting certain secretions and releasing tell-tale scent compounds. When dogs smell each others’ rear ends, they aren’t really smelling each other (so to speak), they are smelling the characteristic odor products.
But why? The obvious reason is that it provides an odorous fingerprint, a tell-tale tail-tell. Dogs, primates and many other animals smell each other to identify strangers from those they know. Do humans do it? We evolved off of all fours long ago, so having scent glands “down below” wouldn’t do us much good, unless you wanted to bend over in the street to say hello. But we do have quite a garden of smells going on up above, in our armpits and chests.
It turns out that people can be identified by their chest and armpit bacterial odors using an “electronic nose”. It also turns out that we think people with more diverse immune genes smell better than those who are genetically closer to us, a sign that we use our nose to pursue genetic diversity. And most women can tell you some tale of sensitivity to smells when pregnant or ovulating. Some research even indicates that we can smell sick people! Is this why we nuzzle our noses into the napes of necks when getting romantic? To test the smelly waters?
And what about our species’ proclivity toward perfume? Here’s what Rob Dunn theorizes:

Then there is a final piece to this story, the issue of subterfuge. Very early in our human history, we began to take advantage of smells produced elsewhere in nature to perfume our bodies. We think of perfume as lovely in moderation, but there is another way to think of perfume, as a way to cheat. When you apply deodorant or perfume, you are covering up the odors produced by your bacteria with an odor regarded as pleasant, at least to the conscious brain and perhaps, if the perfume and deodorant companies have done their jobs, to the subconscious too, which is important since that seems to be where the decisions are being made11.  I’m not sure where this leaves us other than with the impression that nearly the entirety of modern humanity has figured out how to smell like a peacock. Beware both the wolf in sheep’s clothing and the Gonorrhea that smells like Old Spice.

For more, check out: Sick People Smell Bad: Why Dogs Sniff Dogs, Humans Sniff Humans, and Dogs Sometimes Sniff Humans
(via Scientific American)

jtotheizzoe:

What do you smell like? I mean, really smell like? And WHY do you smell like you smell like?

The natural odors of most animals, besides those like skunk musk, are actually a result of bacteria digesting certain secretions and releasing tell-tale scent compounds. When dogs smell each others’ rear ends, they aren’t really smelling each other (so to speak), they are smelling the characteristic odor products.

But why? The obvious reason is that it provides an odorous fingerprint, a tell-tale tail-tell. Dogs, primates and many other animals smell each other to identify strangers from those they know. Do humans do it? We evolved off of all fours long ago, so having scent glands “down below” wouldn’t do us much good, unless you wanted to bend over in the street to say hello. But we do have quite a garden of smells going on up above, in our armpits and chests.

It turns out that people can be identified by their chest and armpit bacterial odors using an “electronic nose”. It also turns out that we think people with more diverse immune genes smell better than those who are genetically closer to us, a sign that we use our nose to pursue genetic diversity. And most women can tell you some tale of sensitivity to smells when pregnant or ovulating. Some research even indicates that we can smell sick people! Is this why we nuzzle our noses into the napes of necks when getting romantic? To test the smelly waters?

And what about our species’ proclivity toward perfume? Here’s what Rob Dunn theorizes:

Then there is a final piece to this story, the issue of subterfuge. Very early in our human history, we began to take advantage of smells produced elsewhere in nature to perfume our bodies. We think of perfume as lovely in moderation, but there is another way to think of perfume, as a way to cheat. When you apply deodorant or perfume, you are covering up the odors produced by your bacteria with an odor regarded as pleasant, at least to the conscious brain and perhaps, if the perfume and deodorant companies have done their jobs, to the subconscious too, which is important since that seems to be where the decisions are being made11.  I’m not sure where this leaves us other than with the impression that nearly the entirety of modern humanity has figured out how to smell like a peacock. Beware both the wolf in sheep’s clothing and the Gonorrhea that smells like Old Spice.

For more, check out: Sick People Smell Bad: Why Dogs Sniff Dogs, Humans Sniff Humans, and Dogs Sometimes Sniff Humans

(via Scientific American)

05

Dec

Reach for the cloves, citrus and evergreens. You’ll wonder why you ever went the artificial route in the first place.

Reach for the cloves, citrus and evergreens. You’ll wonder why you ever went the artificial route in the first place.

25

Mar