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19

Apr

West Virginia gave world indestructible tomato
West Virginia University is giving away free packets of seeds of what has been dubbed ‘the people’s tomato.’

West Virginia gave world indestructible tomato

West Virginia University is giving away free packets of seeds of what has been dubbed ‘the people’s tomato.’

13

Nov

Recipe: Roasted Tomato BisqueThis recipe can be adjusted to make it creamy or chunky.

Recipe: Roasted Tomato Bisque
This recipe can be adjusted to make it creamy or chunky.

10

Oct

Tomato compound may cut men’s stroke riskData only shows an association between high levels of lycopene and lower risk levels of stroke, not cause-and-effect link.

Tomato compound may cut men’s stroke risk
Data only shows an association between high levels of lycopene and lower risk levels of stroke, not cause-and-effect link.

03

Dec

The Flavr Savr tomato was the first commercially grown genetically engineered food to be granted a license for human consumption. By adding an antisense gene, the California-based company Calgene hoped to slow the ripening process of the tomato to prevent softening and rotting, while allowing the tomato to retain its natural flavor and color. The FDA approved the Flavr Savr in 1994; however, the tomatoes were so delicate that they were difficult to transport, and they were off the market by 1997. On top of production and shipping problems, the tomatoes were also reported to have a very bland taste: “The Flavr Savr tomatoes didn’t taste that good because of the variety from which they were developed. There was very little flavor to save,” said Christ Watkins, a horticulture professor at Cornell University.12 bizarre examples of genetic engineering

The Flavr Savr tomato was the first commercially grown genetically engineered food to be granted a license for human consumption. By adding an antisense gene, the California-based company Calgene hoped to slow the ripening process of the tomato to prevent softening and rotting, while allowing the tomato to retain its natural flavor and color.
 
The FDA approved the Flavr Savr in 1994; however, the tomatoes were so delicate that they were difficult to transport, and they were off the market by 1997. On top of production and shipping problems, the tomatoes were also reported to have a very bland taste: “The Flavr Savr tomatoes didn’t taste that good because of the variety from which they were developed. There was very little flavor to save,” said Christ Watkins, a horticulture professor at Cornell University.
12 bizarre examples of genetic engineering