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Mother Nature Network

06

Aug

cygnu-s:

Women of National Geographic

Jane Goodall - studied chimpanzees and has created community-centered conservation programs that not only protect chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania, but also take into account the needs of the people crucial to their protection

Hayat Sindi - created low-tech diagnostic tools to aid in the improvement of healthcare in the world’s poorest communities, has a Cambridge University Ph.D. in biotechnology

Kakenya Ntaiya - teacher building the first school for girls in her rural Kenyan village, refuses to accept Maasai woman’s traditionally subservient role, hopes that expanding education and leadership opportunities for girls will also improve life for the entire village

Nalini Nadkarni - uses mountain climbing gear to climb into the rainforest canopies of Costa Rica and researches the threats of global warming

Sarah McNair-Landry - youngest person to ski to the South Pole, sledged to the North Pole, and crossed ~1,400 miles of the Greenland ice cap to draw attention to the dangers of global warming

Dian Fossey - studied endangered gorillas in the Virunga Volcanoes of Rwanda, her devotion to their care and protection cost her her life and she was probably murdered by poachers who she fought relentlessly.

I hope that one day I can be added to this list of incredible and inspiring women.

Photographs by Hugo Van Lawick, Kris Krug, Philip Scott Andrews, Michael and Patricia Fogden, John Stetson, Robert I. M. Campbell

27

Jul

Men and women literally see the world differentlyA new study shows that the sexes really do see the world differently. Men notice small details and moving things while women are more sensitive to color changes.

Men and women literally see the world differently
A new study shows that the sexes really do see the world differently. Men notice small details and moving things while women are more sensitive to color changes.

30

Apr

In harsh conditions, men don’t want a pretty faceFeminine features are more attractive in healthy countries, perhaps because relatively masculine features indicate a better chance for survival.

In harsh conditions, men don’t want a pretty face
Feminine features are more attractive in healthy countries, perhaps because relatively masculine features indicate a better chance for survival.

28

Feb

Men prefer to date vegetarians, but women don’tA survey on a dating site shows that veggie guys aren’t as popular as veggie women.

Men prefer to date vegetarians, but women don’t
A survey on a dating site shows that veggie guys aren’t as popular as veggie women.

Unique bicycling program helps women in transition find new livesThe nonprofit Gearing Up gives women in recovery a chance to get outside, build self-esteem and bond with one another.

Unique bicycling program helps women in transition find new lives
The nonprofit Gearing Up gives women in recovery a chance to get outside, build self-esteem and bond with one another.

12

Feb

Sex isn’t just for younger womenWomen ages 40 to 65 keep on having sex, especially if they’re white, educated, and have a partner, according to a new study.

Sex isn’t just for younger women
Women ages 40 to 65 keep on having sex, especially if they’re white, educated, and have a partner, according to a new study.

11

Feb

LeanIn.org and Getty unite to create less ridiculous images of womenImages matter, so a new venture aims for diversity

LeanIn.org and Getty unite to create less ridiculous images of women
Images matter, so a new venture aims for diversity

13

Jan

Women go for men with green cars, survey findsA new survey of 2,000 women judges supercar drivers as ‘arrogant,’ and Toyota Prius or Nissan Leaf owners as ‘conscientious,’ ‘intelligent’ and ‘safe.’

Women go for men with green cars, survey finds
A new survey of 2,000 women judges supercar drivers as ‘arrogant,’ and Toyota Prius or Nissan Leaf owners as ‘conscientious,’ ‘intelligent’ and ‘safe.’

06

Jan

Why pull-ups are harder for womenEach individual is different, but on average, women have about 40 percent less upper-body mass than men, making pull-ups more difficult.

Why pull-ups are harder for women
Each individual is different, but on average, women have about 40 percent less upper-body mass than men, making pull-ups more difficult.

28

Dec

treehugger:

Pioneer women loved the great outdoors
Image credit: Alice Killaly, A Picnic to Montmorenci

treehugger:

Pioneer women loved the great outdoors

Image credit: Alice Killaly, A Picnic to Montmorenci